Health care reform bill: Bailout for insurance industry

President Obama signs health bill that transfers millions of federal dollars to insurance industry.

The following guest post is from Michael Lyon, who is the Co-Convenor of the San Francisco Gray Panthers. He originally posted his comments on the “Spirit of 1848″ listserv.

Health Reform?  Off the Table.

First single-payer was off the table. Then a public option anyone could use was off the table.  Then the Medicare buy-in was off the table. And negotiated drug prices.  And cost controls. And .. And…

Most of us are angry, and whipsawed back and forth between pessimism and optimism. The health bill is a gigantic bailout for insurance, drug, hospital, and doctor industries, forcing us onto private insurance, while at the same time forcing down the value of that insurance and making us pay more out-of-pocket, and taking five hundred billion dollars from Medicare over the next ten years.  Our optimistic side says maybe 30 of the 50 million uninsured will get insured in four years, though many won’t be able to afford it and will choose to pay extra taxes instead.  Many of us have children barely able to keep a roof over their heads, maybe they’ll qualify for Medicaid, though Obama wants to cut Medicaid costs. And what if this
awful health bill  failed?   These thoughts drive us nuts.

It has been a very bitter pill to see how marginalized we are.  Deep down, we hoped or expected  that once business realized the cost of insurance-based healthcare was unsustainable, our day would come, and our plan of removing insurance companies would be taken seriously. We were wrong.

The truth is we do not have a movement that’s capable of mounting a serious threat to the functioning of the economy or government, through strikes, sit-ins, or occupations.  We do not have the General Strikes that forced the government to cough up Social Security.  Nor the emerging sit-ins and marches against Jim Crow racism that forced them to cough up Medicare and Medicaid.  We cannot expect different results until we have the kind of movement, that can, and will, stop the gears for long enough to inflict serious pain.

Is healthcare more of a human right than food, when a quarter of US children are food-insecure. Is healthcare more of a human right than housing, when families with kids wait for months for shelter beds in San Francisco?  What about education?

We need to stop asking for our needs to be on the table.  We need to kick the table over.

Thursday, March 25th, 2010 at 07:42